COMMENTARY

The Crisis in the Justice SystemThe State of Grenada comprises three independent but co-equal arms of Government: the Executive (Cabinet), the Legislature (Parliament) and the Judiciary (the Courts). In order for Government to function efficiently, all three arms must be fully operational, none compromised. If one arm ceases to function, there is national chaos. The chaos may not be readily noticeable, but its disastrous effects are sure to be eventually felt by all.

COMMENTARY

The Nicaragua Government has gone too farThe English-speaking Caribbean has just emerged from a season manifesting the spirit, intrinsic to Christmas, of ‘peace on earth and goodwill to all’. Not even the no-confidence vote that was carried against the APNU-AFC coalition government in Guyana on Friday, December 21 disrupted the festive celebrations of the period.

COMMENTARY

Why silence about the Climate Conference in Poland?A statement may have been made one or more of the Caribbean countries that attended the Conference of the Parties (COP) on the disastrous effects of Climate Change in Katowice, Poland in early December, but if any statement was made it is nigh impossible to find it despite the considerable search engines on the internet.

COMMENTARY

The Confusion-maker in ChiefIn 1997, in the case of Irvin Mc Queen v. The Attorney General of Grenada, the Court of Appeal ruled the Pensions Disqualification Act, No.24 of 1983 unconstitutional. The Attorney General did not appeal that ruling, so Mc Queen’s case remains the law of the land. It meant that Government knew since then, that pension restoration was a critical issue to be addressed.

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