Knight in Shining Armor or Pandora’s Box

Some Grenadians are welcoming with glee the news that the World Bank has approved a US$15 million loan from the International Development Association (IDA) for the island.

The IDA is an arm of the World Bank that gives loans to the world’s poorest countries especially in Africa, the Caribbean and Pacific areas.

It was rather interesting to hear a number of people expressing the view that, “money coming at last”, “we get the money”.

However, many of the very said people are ignorant of the fact that this is not free money but funds that will have to be repaid by the taxpaying public including many of them over a period of time.

But one important question which THE NEW TODAY is forced to ask is the following – is this loan really a knight in shining armor to be embraced with open arms or a Pandora’s Box that should not have been opened?

It is interesting to note that the loan is categorised as a development policy loan rather than an investment loan.

The receipt of a development policy loan should be of concern to Grenadians as the World Bank only offers two basic types of loans – investment loans and development policy loans.

For those who are not that knowledgeable, investment loans are used to finance goods, works and services that support economic and social development projects across a broad range of sectors.

In other words, projects that can create jobs; put idle hands to work and generate much needed revenue.

On the other hand, development policy loans, which Grenada received approval in the past two weeks from the World Bank, provide a quick supply of external financing to support a government’s policy and institutional reforms.

The recipients of development policy loans are required to have an agreement on policy and institutional reform actions that can be monitored; satisfactory macro-economic management; and must comply with conditions set by the World Bank and IMF.

Additionally, preparation and approval of a development policy loan requires coordination with the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

This means approval of the IMF programme by the Board of Directors at their recent meeting in Washington was a necessary factor in Grenada’s receipt of the World Bank loan.

Arguably such policy measures are necessary for improving Grenada’s economic performance.  However given the state of the nation’s economy – high unemployment, enormous foreign debt, economic stagnation, and stunted business growth, it begs the question: should Grenada borrow money for policy development at this particular time or investment development at this time?

Unlike an investment loan, a development policy loan will only result in more paper work being prepared by Consultants and being stashed in some government office.

In effect, consultants are the ones who will mainly be hired to prepare policy documents and few Grenadians, if any, will qualify as Consultants for these consultancies.

Do we need more Consultants to tell us what we already know? The Ministry of Finance, headed by one of its longest serving Permanent Secretaries in the history of the country, Timothy Antoine, has enough reports sitting in the Registry on the problems facing the country and the way forward.

Even the political directorate in charge especially Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell who often boast of doing consultancy work with the World Bank, and the Macro-economic planner within the Cabinet, Education Minister, Anthony Boatswain know what the problem is with this ailing economy.

Moreover, a review of the record shows that Grenada recently borrowed money from the World Bank for projects with similar objectives as those of this current loan.

These projects include US$4.5 million for the Safety Net Advancement Project which has an end date of 2015; US$18.2 million for the Regional Disaster Vulnerability Reduction Project covering the period 2011-2017; and US$1 million for the Small Farmer Vulnerability Reduction project which ended in 2010.

Given these factors, why is Grenada borrowing money again from the World Bank to achieve similar objectives of ongoing or just-ended projects at a time when investment in the productive sector to grow the economy is needed?

The last government of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) of Tillman Thomas had undertaken similar projects with funds from the World Bank.

Did the Mitchell administration approach the bank for funding for the new scope of work to be done?

If not, is it a case of the IMF and World Bank putting this on the table as part of the agreement reached for the so-called homegrown 3-year Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP)?

Clearly there are more questions in the air than forthcoming answers from the NNP government of Dr. Mitchell about the details of this loan agreement with the World Bank.

However, one thing is certain, Grenada must put its economic and good governance house in order before it receives any further loans.

There is no doubt that when government went to the World Bank and IMF it opened a Pandora’s Box and all that we have left is hope and nothing more.

Knight in Shining Armor or Pandora’s Box

Some Grenadians are welcoming with glee the news that the World Bank has approved a US$15 million loan from the International Development Association (IDA) for the island.

The IDA is an arm of the World Bank that gives loans to the world’s poorest countries especially in Africa, the Caribbean and Pacific areas.

It was rather interesting to hear a number of people expressing the view that, “money coming at last”, “we get the

However, many of the very said people are ignorant of the fact that this is not free money but funds that will have to be repaid by the taxpaying public including many of them over a period of time.

But one important question which THE NEW TODAY is forced to ask is the following – is this loan really a knight in shining armor to be embraced with open arms or a Pandora’s Box that should not have been opened?

It is interesting to note that the loan is categorised as a development policy loan rather than an investment loan.

The receipt of a development policy loan should be of concern to Grenadians as the World Bank only offers two basic types of loans – investment loans and development policy loans.

For those who are not that knowledgeable, investment loans are used to finance goods, works and services that support economic and social development projects across a broad range of sectors.

In other words, projects that can create jobs; put idle hands to work and generate much needed revenue.

On the other hand, development policy loans, which Grenada received approval in the past two weeks from the World Bank, provide a quick supply of external financing to support a government’s policy and institutional reforms.

The recipients of development policy loans are required to have an agreement on policy and institutional reform actions that can be monitored; satisfactory macro-economic management; and must comply with conditions set by the World Bank and IMF.

Additionally, preparation and approval of a development policy loan requires coordination with the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

This means approval of the IMF programme by the Board of Directors at their recent meeting in Washington was a necessary factor in Grenada’s receipt of the World Bank loan.

Arguably such policy measures are necessary for improving Grenada’s economic performance.  However given the state of the nation’s economy – high unemployment, enormous foreign debt, economic stagnation, and stunted business growth, it begs the question: should Grenada borrow money for policy development at this particular time or investment development at this time?

Unlike an investment loan, a development policy loan will only result in more paper work being prepared by Consultants and being stashed in some government office.

In effect, consultants are the ones who will mainly be hired to prepare policy documents and few Grenadians, if any, will qualify as Consultants for these consultancies.

Do we need more Consultants to tell us what we already know? The Ministry of Finance, headed by one of its longest serving Permanent Secretaries in the history of the country, Timothy Antoine, has enough reports sitting in the Registry on the problems facing the country and the way forward.

Even the political directorate in charge especially Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell who often boast of doing consultancy work with the World Bank, and the Macro-economic planner within the Cabinet, Education Minister, Anthony Boatswain know what the problem is with this ailing economy.

Moreover, a review of the record shows that Grenada recently borrowed money from the World Bank for projects with similar objectives as those of this current loan.

These projects include US$4.5 million for the Safety Net Advancement Project which has an end date of 2015; US$18.2 million for the Regional Disaster Vulnerability Reduction Project covering the period 2011-2017; and US$1 million for the Small Farmer Vulnerability Reduction project which ended in 2010.

Given these factors, why is Grenada borrowing money again from the World Bank to achieve similar objectives of ongoing or just-ended projects at a time when investment in the productive sector to grow the economy is needed?

The last government of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) of Tillman Thomas had undertaken similar projects with funds from the World Bank.

Did the Mitchell administration approach the bank for funding for the new scope of work to be done?
If not, is it a case of the IMF and World Bank putting this on the table as part of the agreement reached for the so-called homegrown 3-year Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP)?

Clearly there are more questions in the air than forthcoming answers from the NNP government of Dr. Mitchell about the details of this loan agreement with the World Bank.

However, one thing is certain, Grenada must put its economic and good governance house in order before it receives any further loans.

There is no doubt that when government went to the World Bank and IMF it opened a Pandora’s Box and all that we have left is hope and nothing more.

G’da at Regional Piano Recital

QueenCongratulations go out to Chelsi Hurst, who was Grenada’s representative in the 1st Regional Piano Recital held in St Kitts on June 22 and hosted by the Irv Swanston School of Music under the theme “Outside The Box…Across Limitless Musical Horizons”.

One student and teacher from each participating territory travelled to St Kitts where they were treated to a weekend of sharing and learning, all of which culminated in an exciting  performance arts concert featuring not only students from the region but also from the Irv Swanston School of Music.

Irv Swanston, the founder and director of this educational institution has for years envisioned the coming together of the region on one musical platform to showcase and celebrate the talents of young, budding pianists.

She believes that such opportunities like this would help students to build their confidence in performance and forge ties and social networks with other students like them.

This event featured teacher and student duos from St Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Barbados, St Lucia, Antigua & Barbuda, Anguilla and St Maarten, with the students performing from Grade 5 to Diploma levels of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music Exams (ABRSM).

Riding on the wave of the recently concluded St Kitts Music Festival, the highlights of the trip were a dinner at the St Kitts Marriott with the Prime Minister of St Kitts, Dr Denzil Douglas and then the recital the following evening at the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank’s Sir Cecil Jacobs Auditorium which was also under his patronage.

In his support of this initiative as Ms Swanston also marked eighteen (18) years since the school was first started, he states in his congratulatory address : “The mastery of a musical instrument requires discipline and dedication; Discipline and dedication build character; And all nations need persons of character”.

As we celebrate in Chelsi’s achievement, it is hoped that this will inspire other future young pianists and musicians at large to take advantage of opportunities to improve their craft, and be desirous of sharing that God-given talent with others as we all play our part in journeying beyond musical horizons.

Carnival Queen Contestants Presented

Seven contestants vying for the title of Miss Grenada Carnival Queen showed themselves to the public for the first time during the official Queen Show launch on Sunday at Port Louis.

We present the successful participants:

aria mary francis MEDAria Mary Francis is a 21 year-old model of four years, who has been involved in the creative industry from 2010. She resides at Happy Hill, St. George’s.

She has participated in pageants and modeling events such as the 2011 Elite Model Look Caribbean competition in Trinidad and represented Grenada at the Miss. Humanity International pageant, in Barbados in 2013.

Aria is a graduate of the St. Joseph’s Convent, St. George’s. She is currently pursuing an Associate Degree, at the T.A. Marryshow Community College, in the field of Social Work, following the completion of two years practical training in Early Childhood Care, as part of the Grenada Youth Apprenticeship Programme (GYAP).

Her other creative pursuits include acting and singing. She is also a member of Toastmaster’s International [Grenada]. Aria’s future goals are to model professionally, develop her acting skills for theatre and film, and use her social work knowledge and experience to contribute towards the social well being of others.

daneille douglas MEDDaneille Douglas – is a 25 year old Grenadian who grew up in Tobago, her second home.  She considers herself beautiful, smart and very sociable with a love for fashion.

Daneille participated in a number of Fashion Shows including Visions of Spice, Strut the Run Way 2 and Zarycon Fashion Extravagant. Daneille became interested in fashion when she made the cover of Abstract Magazine in 2008 in Trinidad. In the future Daneille intends to publish a Grenadian Fashion Magazine and also establish a Fashion Week in Grenada.

renisha whitnet wells MEDRenisha Whitney Wells – was born on August 16, 1993 and lives in St. Andrews. Renisha attended the St. Joseph’s Convent Grenville and continued her education at the T. A. Marryshow Community College from which she graduated with an Associate Degree in General Studies with honors in law and economics.

She  placed second runner-up in Miss St. Andrew’s Carnival Queen Show in 2012 and is the reigning Miss Carriacou & Petite Martinique Carnival Queen. She is presently employed as an assistant teacher at the St. Andrew’s Anglican Secondary School. She enjoys reading, socializing, watching television and going to the beach. Her philosophy: “Life is like a mirror and what you see is a reflection of what is on the inside.” Her future goal is to pursue a career in Economics.

nikita mc vean MEDNikita Mc Vean – is a 21-year-old aspiring politician. She resides at Gouyave, St. John’s.

She is a graduate of the Beacon High School. In Secondary School Nikita was actively involved in Junior Achievement, Grenlec Inter- Secondary Schools Debate, RBTT Young Leaders Programme and SGU Knowledge Bowl. Nikita was granted the award for most outstanding Young Leader in the RBTT Young Leader Programme in 2010.

She attended the T.A. Marryshow Community College where she majored in History, Sociology and Law. Presently she is making preparations to start studies at the University of the West Indies in 2015.

Nikita believes that by being the Parliamentary Representative of her Parish, she can make a beneficial contribution to the lives of the people of St. John’s.

ebony telesford MEDEbony Telesford from the community of Vendome was born on October 28th 1993, to parents Keisha Telesford and Wilt “Tallpree” Cambridge. Ebony says she is a creative, amiable and optimistic person who thrives on learning and experiencing new things.

She attended the St. Joseph’s Convent St. George’s. Ebony has a passion for culture and has been very active in drumming, Belair dancing. Ebony’s educational goal is to study international business. She is presently employed at Sandals La Source as a front desk receptionist.

Her hobbies are writing and reading. Among her favorite authors are J.K Rowling, and, Khaled Hosseini.
She is motivated by her desire to be an asset to society. She is inspired by President Barack Obama because he has high moral values, he is dedicated to his promises and he is the image for perseverance during adversity.

keisha mc leod MEDMiss Keisha McLeod – was born on June 23, 1994. She is from the village of La Fortune in St. Patrick’s. She attended Mac Donald College where she completed her secondary education. She is presently attending T.A, Marryshow Community College studying General Office Administration.

She started out with modeling at secondary school and won the title of Miss, Mac Donald College. She is the second runner-up in the Miss St. Patrick’s Carnival Queen Show 2011. Keisha believes that once there is breath in our lungs nothing is impossible to accomplish. She values the simple things in life because they always seem to have the greatest impact on life.

michelle wiltshire MEDMichelle Wiltshire – is from the parish of St. David, born 7th July 1993. Her name simply means “Who is like God” which predestined the goal of her life.

Michelle possesses unique and undeniable beauty, which afforded her opportunities as a young model. She considers herself to possess good vision and talent.

Michelle is musically and culturally expressive and values the essence of community. She is the cultural coordinator of the Vincennes Sports and Cultural Club which is geared toward the holistic upliftment in the community with focus on education, culture and sports.

She intends to devote her life to the service of others in the vocation of nursing. She wants only to serve, and believes that “the longing to truly serve ignites only in humble hearts”.

The seven contestants were selected after a screening process by the National Queen Show Committee. Its Director Shirma Wells said “The contestants were chosen with after careful consideration of their level of education, character, personality and physical appeal”. The show was not held in 2013 and the organizers are working hard at ensuring that the National Queen Show is back on the Spicemas agenda.

The reigning Carnival Queen from 2012 is Ms Anisha David.

Corruption by any other name

By Dr. Francis Antoine

Corruption occurs frequently because good people sit by and allow bad people to do bad things.  If corruption persists and becomes pervasive then a culture of corruption develops.  Such culture of corruption is responsible in many ways for the decadence of many societies.

As it stands today, Grenada harbours a culture of corruption that is bad for our social and economic development.  Yes, we all do make errors.  And for those of us who erred and have apologised, and corrected our errors, we must be given another chance to serve our organisations and societies.  But errors that are repeated and become a pattern of behaviour, those are not permissible and must bear the necessary consequences.

Corruption is defined by Merriam-Webster dictionary as dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power, typically but not always involving bribery.  Corruption often requires others to look away or simply to keep quiet.  Synonyms include dishonesty, unscrupulousness, double-dealing, fraud, misconduct, criminality, wrongdoing, venality, extortion, crookedness, sleaze, decay.

Corruption is, in essence, the impairment of the integrity, virtue, or moral principle of someone; and that in itself represents depravity, decay, decadence.  Corruption often requires inducement to do wrong by improper or unlawful means.  It may include bribery and gross departure from original acceptable practices or from what is correct.

We are aware of that farmers are very hard working people.  Many of our farmers toil on very difficult terrains, sometimes dangerously so.

Very many struggle to get by every day.  Many have large families dependent on them as the sole bread winner.  So how, for example, is it that someone who is not a registered member of the GCNA becomes a member of the board, far less to become the Chairman of the board?

Why is it that the other elected members of the said board allow that to happen repeatedly year after year after year?  That, by its very nature, epitomises corruption, dishonest conduct, or fraud.

Further, the fact that two elected members of the said GCNA board get away with that illegal act is even more damnable. That raises the question, does anyone sincerely care anymore about the welfare of the nutmeg farmers and farmers in general?

What about the GCNA organisation that allows that to occur? What are the elected board members doing during its term of office that allows that malpractice?  What impact does such corruption have on the image of our tri-island nation, and the Caribbean in general?

The issue of corruption is of further concern when one realises that one or a few members of the board of that organisation can move funds from various financial accounts to buy (invest or gamble) life insurance in one’s personal name without the board’s consent.

What is also disconcerting is the fact that the few members who did that are not challenged by the other members of that board. This, therefore, raises the question of misuse and mismanagement of monies by the GCNA board.  None of us is perfect, and to err is human.  But being human is no excuse for knowingly allowing corruption.

The issue of corruption is both disgusting and frustrating when one finds out that even after an authorised investigation was conducted, and, according to separate independent legal reviews of the investigation, the activity of those few members may amount to criminal activity.

Yet, other elected board members do nothing about the issue. Thus, they in part allow corruption or fraud to occur.  In addition, when some farmers raise questions and concerns about what amounted to having gambled farmers’ money, they are simply being frustrated or ignored.  Other farmers simply feel helpless or powerless to do anything about it.  Many refuse to even further participate in their own organisation.

Martin Luther King said that “the ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

It seems that there is quite a lack of people in Grenada willing to stand up for what is right, hence the persistence and development of a culture of corruption.  Could it be that we have become lethargic and are too absorbed in trying to make ends meet?  Or could it be that we are too busy to be concerned about our society in general? Or could it be that we have become selfishly greedy pursuing our own goals and are too busy to be concerned?  Or could it be a combination of those and other reasons?

Despite that though, there is great hope for our people because of those few who have, over the years, taken action and raised their voices and continue to do so.

I call on all Grenadian farmers, Grenadians and Caribbean people in general, to always do the right and honourable thing.  Let us clean up the corruption in our organisations and societies. So, for example, there should never ever be any elected GCNA board member who is not a qualified registered member making decisions on behalf of farmers.
That would amount to gross dishonesty or fraud.

There should never be people on boards or in authority, or in any organisation or body, making decisions that do not take into consideration the best interest of our farmers, our people, and our island nations.

We do know that people are not perfect and errors do occur. We also know that a few people will attempt to defraud others in order to line their pockets. That is why there are a number of people elected or appointed to maintain checks and balances that should prevent fraud.

However, when those elected or appointed people become aware of misdoings and do nothing about it, then they too become liable for the fraudulent act(s).  We know that a man is judged by the company he keeps.  So, if a man fails to point out corruption in the organisation to which he belongs then he is likely to be either corrupt and/or condones corruption.

We are familiar with the saying that the upholder is as guilty as the thief.  And if a man aids and abets a criminal act he is made to pay a price.  In the GCNA such a man cannot claim to be concerned about farmers while he does nothing about corruption ongoing in GCNA; hence, he must be hypocritical if he does nothing about corruption when he sees it.  Such a man would have lost all moral authority and integrity because he failed in his moral obligation.

We must, however, acknowledge and applaud those who over the years have made repeated efforts to challenge the board to do the right thing, even though their efforts were being rebuffed and put down by the board.  It is good to know we still have quite a few good men, and the farmers know who they are.

Failure to say and do something on behalf of farmers, when farmers money was being misused in order to buy personal life insurance unbeknown to the GCNA board and membership, and to now claim to be sorry for farmers who do not receive a salary (make that income) during the off season for nutmegs and cocoa, is grossly disingenuous.

If that man was not concerned then about the misuse of GCNA’s farmers money being used to pay illegal board members, but now complains about having to pay court cost for being forced to do the right thing by the nutmeg act, then that person is being disingenuous.

In industry or business individuals are held accountable for their responsibilities. When they succeed they are rewarded.  When they fail they are made to pay the price, which may be demotion, dismissal, or pay the difference if it is a contract.

In government political parties lose their right to govern.  However, in Grenada quite a few fraudsters seem to succeed in getting appointed to boards and institutions, even when there are doubts about their integrity.  Oh yes, we must be going the wrong way.

Our farmers work too hard for us to allow them to be taken advantage of.  This, therefore, is a call for all of us, who believe in right and wrong, and who want to see better for our tri–island nation, and the Caribbean in general, to show some intestinal fortitude and stand up for what is right, because we can fall for anything that is wrong.

Farmers need to make sure that at the upcoming area meetings they select delegates who will represent their interests.  Farmers also need to know that those delegates must be accountable to them and report back to them in a timely manner.

Farmers need to make sure, henceforth, that they actively participate in the management of their own affairs without fear or despair. We must rally together to bring about a better GCNA.  Yes it will not be easy and, as a fellow farmer recently reminded me, things will not be financially good for the new board.

We will falter, and we will make mistakes, but we must not be daunted by the size of the tasks ahead of us.  We must be prepared for the tough battles ahead and, if we are united in our efforts, we will succeed.

Bishop killers get government estate

Grenada Innovative Farms Limited gets approval for Grand Bras Estate

Grenada Innovative Farms Limited gets approval for Grand Bras Estate

The Grenada Government on Tuesday signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Ministry of Agriculture granting a local company the right to lease the Grand Bras Estate.

The agreement with the Grenada Innovative Farms Limited (GIF) which was signed during a brief ceremony at the Ministerial Complex on Tuesday signaled the start of the commercialization of the Grand Bras Estate.

Grenada Innovative Farms Limited is a locally-owned and registered Agribusiness Company that will seek to transform the operations of the Grand Bras Estate.

One of the directors involved in the company is the former revolutionary figure, John “Chaulkie” Ventour, one of the 17 former army and government figures convicted for the bloody murder of Prime Minister Maurice Bishop in October 1983.

Ventour told the media that details about the company’s plans for the estate would be disclosed at a later date during an organised press conference.

Speculation is rife that several of the former prisoners might be involved in the company.

He did indicate that the company would be using the Japanese business model in developing the estate.

The signing of the MOU is considered a milestone achievement in Government’s ongoing efforts to commercialize Government Estates as part of its thrust to increase domestic food production, reduce the high food import bill, increase foreign exchange earnings and create jobs in higher skilled areas.

The lease agreement between the Government and Grenada Innovative Farms Limited is for 30 years.

Agriculture Minister Roland Bhola commented on government’s leasing of 121 acres of its 200 acres, which comprises the Grand Bras Estate in St Andrew to Grenada Innovative Farms Limited.

He said that the remaining 79 acres of estate-lands would remain under the management of the Ministry of Agriculture for its ongoing Germ Plasm Programme.

Government also sees it as a significant achievement since July 2014 marks one year since Cabinet established a committee to oversee the process.

Both parties have worked out an arrangement for the estate workers who are represented by the Bank and General Workers Union and the Public Workers Union (PWU).

The workers have  the option of choosing to remain employed on the estate with Grenada Innovative Farms Limited or apply for retirement as many are of that age.

The MOU was signed by Parliamentary Secretary in the Ministry of Agriculture, Simon Stiell, as well as Merina Jessamy, Permanent Secretary (Acting) with responsibility for Agriculture, Land and Environment and Liam James and John Ventour for GIF in the presence of Agriculture Minister, Roland Bhola.

Some of the remaining Government-controlled Estates identified for commercialisation are Bellevue, Mt. Reuil in St. Patrick’s and Limlair on the sister isle of Carriacou.

The second estate identified for possible commercialization will be the Bellevue Estate.

Government is said to be considering one of the two proposals for lease ownership including one by the state-owned Marketing and National Importing Board (MNIB).

The company to be awarded this estate lease could be decided later this month.

More Customers Win With LIME

Jermilia Joseph experience Vincy Mas compliments LIME

Jermilia Joseph experience Vincy Mas compliments LIME

Jermilia Joseph of Carriacou left Grenada last week Friday for St Vincent to experience Vincy Mas compliments telecommunications company LIME.

Ms Joseph is one of LIME’s Homegrown Programme Promotion lucky winners for the month of June. The lucky winner is the recipient of an all-inclusive trip for two to experience Carnival in St Vincent and the Grenadines.

Speaking to reporters Ms Joseph said when she received the call informing her about her fully paid trip, she believed someone was pulling a prank on her but when she realized that it was real she was overcome with excitement.

She told the media that this fits into a good vacation package for her and one she intends to enjoy. She commended LIME for the promotion that gives back tangible products and rewards to customers and commended the initiative of giving Grenadians an opportunity to experience Carnival on another island.

Other winners for the June promotion were presented with their prizes of $500 each in benefits and services from LIME.

Ms Joan Joseph, Mildred Redhead, Lindy Richards-Toussaint and Arthur Chasteau are last month’s winners.
Marketing Manager Kelly Rawlston Mitchell made the presentations. He says the company rewarded 10 lucky customers since the promotion began in April. Customers eligible to win must pay their bills on time or sign up for a service.

Lindy Richards-Toussaint collects her winnings from Marketing Manager Kelly Rawlston Mitchell

Lindy Richards-Toussaint collects her winnings from Marketing Manager Kelly Rawlston Mitchell

Last month winners received shopping vouchers valued $500.00.

The LIME Homegrown Programme Promotion is in response to Government’s Structural Adjustment Programme entered into with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The three-year programme has seen the implementation of a series of tax increases in some cses by 100%.

It is with this programme in mind that LIME instituted the promotion with the intent to assist customers for a six-month period. The LIME initiative is undertaken in partnership with the Grenville Credit Union, John’s Boutique, Rubis Gas, CK’s Super Value and Country Cold Store rewarding customers with cash, groceries, gas and many more prizes.

With Spice Mas 2K14 weeks away the company is offering special packages of one month double data for those updating their plans; Free Bonus Minutes; Special Carnival Packages for lucky customers; and lots of giveaways as the company rolls out a series of Caravans.

Chairperson for the promotional event, Troy Garvey disclosed that the company is setting its tone for the oncoming Carnival with bigger, better and much more colours for its Monday Night Mas Band, J’ouvert, Steelband and Fancy Mas Bands.

Without disclosing the contents of the packages that will be available, Garvey maintains that LIME stands strong behind its brand and its products.

Stadium will be the venue

The Grenada National Stadium is the venue for major carnival events despite plans to host the Caribbean Premier League this weekend.

Minister for Economic, Trade, Planning and Cooperatives, Oliver Joseph during Tuesday’s Post-Cabinet Press Briefing said that Cabinet on Monday reached an agreement with the Grenada Cricket Association Board to allow Spice Mas Corporation to host its major Carnival events at the National Stadium.

Minister Joseph said that all measures would be taken to ensure the field is protected to host the games later this month.

He gave the assurance that whatever structure is erected for the hosting of these events would be swiftly removed immediately after its use to ensure that the CPL Games go ahead as planned.

Grenada will host the opening round of the 2014 Limacol Caribbean Premier League (CPL) from today (Friday July 11)

The National Cricket Stadium, which hosted several West Indies Cricket matches since its construction since 2002 including the 2007 World Cup games seats some 16, 200 patrons.

The National Athletic Stadium has been the venue for Carnival events in recent years however this year the stadium is under construction.

Spice Mas Corporation announced plans earlier this month to transform the Roy St John’s Playing Field into a Carnival Metropolis for the staging of major Carnival activities after Grenada was accepted as one of the venue for staging CPL Games.

However logistical difficulties and the cost to upgrade the Roy St John’s Playing Field to an acceptable level to host these events forced the SMC to seek an alternative venue.

The SMC’s first Carnival event for this year to be held at the National Stadium  will be the Children’s Carnival Frolic carded for August 02.

The theme for Spicemas 2014 is “Spicemas, the Mecca of Calypso and Soca.”

Grenada to benefit massively from CPL, says minister

Sports Minister Emmalin Pierre believes that Grenada’s hosting of the opening games for the Caribbean Premiere League will result in an immense level of marketing for the island`s tourism.

For the first time this year, Grenada will hosts matches in the Twenty20 event, with the national stadium playing host to the opening ceremony July 11 as well as the first three matches in the tournament.

Speaking during a ceremony in which Sandals presented the government of Grenada with EC$1,35,000 ($50,000) to contribute to the cost of acquiring the rights to host the games, Pierre said the exposure Grenada was poised to receive would exceed the money involved.

“What we are going to achieve single handedly on that day, the country will never be able to pay for this. We cannot afford to pay for this, the island and its facility will be on show for the entire world, think about the millions in India and South Africa who will be watching,” Pierre said.

“It’s opening a barrage of opportunities. The games will be exposing our young people to the many opportunities that are available through sports.”

The CPL opening ceremony will be followed by the first game between Antigua Hawksbills and Guyana Amazon Warriors, last year’s losing finalists.

A double-header will be played the following day, with Trinidad and Tobago Red Steel facing Barbados Tridents in the first game and St Lucia Zouks and defending champions Jamaica Tallawahs squaring off in the second.

Pierre said the tournament’s presence would also have a significant impact on hotel room occupancy, during what is traditionally a slow and low season.

It will cost the government $500,000 to host the games and funds are being raised through various partners. The National Lottery Authorities has already contributed $250,000.

The CPL runs from July 11 to Aug 17 across eight Caribbean countries.

Thompson sent to Parliament

The Keith Mitchell-led administration in St. George’s is sticking to its guns that Commissioner of Police Willan Thompson will not remain in charge of the Royal Grenada Police Force (RGPF).

Thompson was forced to take early leave following the return to power of Dr. Mitchell and his New National Party (NNP) after the February 2013 general election.

In his first meeting with the new Prime Minister, the Commissioner was told by the Grenadian leader that he was not comfortable with him as the island’s Chief Security Officer and raised concerns over a number of issues.

Commissioner Thompson was forced to apply to the Public Service Commission (PSC) for leave and proceeded to the United Kingdom to pursue studies to qualify as a barrister-at-law.

The official leave of the chief cop was due to end on July 6 and he was mandated to report to duties on the following day.

However, last Friday night the PSC dispatched a letter to the Commissioner informing him that he should report to work on Monday morning at the Office of the Clerk of Parliament.

According to a well-placed source, the Commissioner had concerns about the letter and decided to report for work at Police headquarters at Fort George.

He said that when Thompson showed up, he was met on arrival by retired Commissioner Winston James who was brought back by Prime Minister Mitchell to take charge of the operations of the force.

He spoke of a brief encounter on the fort between the two senior
police officers before Commissioner Thompson left the compound and headed for the Office of the Prime Minister to allegedly meet with the Permanent Secretary, Lana Mc Phail.

He stated that following the meeting COP Thompson departed for the Office of the Clerk of Parliament.

Speculation is rife that the island’s chief cop might be asked to take over from the current holder of the post, Ray Donald who is due to go on retirement soon.

THE NEW TODAY understands that the PSC would also soon have to make a determination on the future of another senior police officer, Inspector Senneth Joseph who like Thompson was forced to take early leave following the NNP victory at the polls.

Joseph was removed as head of the Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) which, under the former Congress government was investigating a number of alleged acts of wrong-going under the 1995-2008 NNP administrations.

Among the matters were an unaccounted EC$1.6 million that were handed over by a Russian outfit that had entered into an oil and gas agreement with the Mitchell government.

Insp. Joseph came in for a barrage of criticisms from now Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Legal Affairs, Elvin Nimrod who had accused the senior police officer of being linked to the main opposition Congress party.

The police officer sought to institute legal action against Nimrod but the two reportedly reached a settlement on the issue.

Both Joseph and Nimrod are from the sister isle of Carriacou.

Like Thompson, Joseph took leave from the PSC to travel to London in the aftermath of the NNP victory at the pols to pursue legal studies aimed at qualifying as an attorney-at-law.

Joseph is said to be back in the country to return to work as a public officer at the end of his official leave.