Blingen announced that the United States had provided written responses to Russia regarding the Ukraine crisis

The US response to Russia is that “Russia is forging a serious diplomatic path if it chooses to do so,” Blingen told reporters Wednesday, and I look forward to continuing to discuss the document with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov now in the coming days. Retrieved in Moscow.

US Ambassador to Russia John Sullivan responded in person to the Russian Foreign Ministry. The written document aims to address Moscow’s public concerns and outline areas where the United States says it sees the potential for progress with Russia – arms control, transparency and stability, a top US embassy official told reporters.

“The document we provide includes the concerns of the United States and our allies and partners about Russia’s actions undermining security, the policy and practical evaluation of the concerns raised by Russia, and our own proposals for areas where we can do so. Find the common ground,” Blingen said.

It is unknown at this time what he will do after leaving the post. U.S. officials say Russia has shown no signs of escalating, and have warned that an invasion could be imminent as Moscow concentrates tens of thousands of troops on the Ukrainian border.

The United States has repeatedly said that Russian President Vladimir Putin’s central demand – that the United States and NATO promise never to allow Ukraine into an alliance – is simply not a start. Although Blinken declined to elaborate on the details provided to Moscow, he said he had rejected Moscow’s demands for NATO’s commitment to Ukraine and reiterated the West’s general response to upholding NATO’s open door policy.

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“There will be no change. There will be no change,” Clinker said in support of the US-NATO alliance’s open door policy.

“We make it clear that we have important policies that guarantee the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine and that the states have the right to choose and choose their own security arrangements and alliances,” he added.

Blingen said Wednesday that the ball is now in Russia’s court.

“If Russia is serious about working, I think there are important things that need to work. It depends on President Putin. Let’s see how they respond,” he said.

‘Not a formal negotiation document’

In a US written response to Moscow, Blinken said President Joe Biden was “closely involved.”

Responding to a question from CNN’s Kylie Atwood, Blinken said, “You know, like getting ideas, inputs, ideas from partners and associates, we’ve reviewed it over and over again in the last few weeks.

Blingen argued that the document issued Wednesday was “not a formal negotiation document.”

“These are not explicit proposals. If it is serious, we can put together areas and some ideas for advancing collective security,” he said.

Blinken underlined that the US response was “fully integrated with Ukraine and our European allies and partners,” and cited a source who knew that Ukraine had received a copy of the US document.

Blingen said the document has been shared with Congress and will be explained to congressional leaders later Wednesday.

He said the United States would not release its document because it believed that diplomacy had a better chance of success if it allowed for secret talks.

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“We hope and expect Russia to have the same perspective and take our plan seriously,” Blinken said.

However, US officials have acknowledged that the full document is likely to be released after Russia receives it.

The Russian Foreign Ministry confirmed the response. “Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander V. Khrushchev welcomed US Ambassador to Moscow John Sullivan at his request,” the ministry said in a statement.

Coalition Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said on Wednesday that NATO had sent a written response to Moscow’s security demands. He told a news conference in Brussels, Belgium, that the NATO proposal had been sent “parallel to the United States.”

Although the positions of Moscow and the alliance were “far away,” the NATO leader outlined three key areas in which NATO sees a “room for progress.” He called on Moscow and NATO to reopen their “respective offices in Moscow and Brussels.”

“We must make full use of existing military-to-military communications to improve transparency and reduce risks,” he said. “See also setting up a civilian hotline for emergency use.”

Still hope to inspire diplomacy

U.S. officials say they have decided to respond in writing – with Russia’s request to put forward ideas written in December – in an attempt to provoke US diplomacy into believing that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine will be thwarted.

“We put forward these ideas because if they negotiate in good faith, they have the potential to address Russia’s stated concerns through mutual obligations, while enhancing the security of ourselves and our allies and allies,” Blingen said Wednesday.

“We are ready for dialogue. We want diplomacy. If Russia eases its aggression against Ukraine and stops its annoying rhetoric and approaches discussions on future security, we are ready to move forward where there is potential for communication and cooperation. With mutual understanding in Europe,” he said.

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But some allies and experts are skeptical of how much emphasis should be placed on this document from the United States because it is not expected to accommodate talks on Russia’s key demands, and Moscow is concerned that the US response could be used as an excuse. It can be said that diplomacy has failed.

The top US diplomat acknowledged that “Russia may not be serious about this at all.”

“But we have an obligation to test that proposal, to pursue the diplomatic path, and not to leave any diplomatic stone, because resolving these differences amicably with our policies is more desirable than renewed aggression, renewed conflict, and all that comes from it,” he said.

“But the thing is, we’re ready for anything,” Blingen said.

The story was updated on Wednesday with background and additional improvements.

CNN’s Casey Riddle, Ellie Kaufman, Darya Tarasova, Lauren Kent and Lindsay Isaac contributed to the report.

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