Anti-Litter Law to be strengthened

A new piece of legislation is being brought to Parliament as aimed at minimising the breeding sites of mosquitoes on the island.

The strengthening of the anti-litter law comes against the background of the threat the Zika Virus poses to the Caribbean Region.

Health Minister Nickolas Steele told the media on Tuesday that he will be presenting an Anti-Litter Bill to help cut back on the mosquito population.

Minister Steele said he will be seeking the support of both the Members of the Lower and Upper Houses of Parliament in order to ensure that the legislation comes part of the law.

He said that everyone should be aware that littering is partly responsible for the breeding of mosquitos.

“The Anti-Litter Bill seeks to remedy this or to deal with it aggressively. I think now is the time, we are all aware of the cost to the Nation and personal cost to us all, the suffering that occurred to those of us who did get the Chik-V last year. So we have to put all possible mechanisms in place to prevent the spread of the Zika Virus,” he told the media.




Minister Steele said residents will be monitored to ensure that they are not breaking any of the laws that would give rise to an increase in the mosquito population.

The Health Minister pointed out that his ministry is closely monitoring the Zika Virus and has put certain mechanism in place to protect Grenada.

He said there will be an aggressive increase in fogging, as well as the use of chemicals in areas of stagnant water to help kill mosquitoes.

The Zika Virus is an Aiedes Aegypti Mosquito-borne disease.

Symptoms from the illness are similar to dengue fever and is generally mild and self-limiting, lasting four to seven days.

Incubation period is usually between three to twelve days.

Symptoms of ZIKV infection may include fever, headache, conjunctivitis, rash, myalgia, and arthralgia. Other less common symptoms reported include: anorexia, diarrhoea, constipation, abdominal pain and dizziness.

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