What democracy is at stake?

After reading the article published in a number of weeklies under a similar title written in the affirmative, I must confess that it left me and I am sure many others in a state of astonishment. Presumably the same feeling a large number of devotees of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) felt after the result of the February 19, 2013 election was announced.

The heading is not only utterly misleading but speaks directly to the state of paranoia which existed in Grenada over the past 4 1⁄2 years, something the majority of Grenadians decided they wanted no part of.

According to my dictionary definition of the word DEMOCRACY, it declares: “A system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives.”

If decent memory would be on my side, all the voters who decided to participate in the February 19 general election were all eligible! Which part of this scenario was estranged to the author of that spurious writing? Plain and simple the government was democratically elected! Put that in your whistle and blow it comrade.

I am still here in an attempt to envision how this writer and the few who may be of like ilk have interpreted the closure of Parliament which the past Prime Minister said was meant “to protect our democracy.” Are these idiots for real? He must have been skydiving while writing the article….LOL

So what about the case where public workers were repeatedly paid late and the Office of the Prime Minister was not even appraised of the situation prior to it happening? Tillman Thomas said his Finance Minister did not make him aware. I am wondering what else the then Minister knew that the Prime Minister was not made aware?

To juxtapose Dr Mitchell against the likes of Adolf Hitler, Karl Marx et al., is not just preposterous but helps to illuminate the lunacy which exists in the minds of those haters of the man who has been the longest serving Prime Minister of Grenada and the only Prime Minister in the Commonwealth to have ever been elected to Parliament and have won all the available seats on two occasions.

Democracy at stake! Writing an article armed with so many subtle antagonisms does not change the facts of this one-sided debate.

The NDC equipped with so many legal minds in its Cabinet thought it wise to create legislation to cover for their political appointees. The then Leader of Government Business in the lower house, Nazim Burke said, “the same way he will not want to have Mitchell’s appointments they will make it easy on a new government to get rid of all such workers.”

The essence of the legislation is that whenever an election is called the termination clause of these contracts immediately takes effect.




All workers under the then Prime Ministers’ ministry were given notice of the termination of their contracts immediately, on the working day following the last election. This happened even before a Cabinet was sworn in. Who then was responsible for sending home workers?

Contrary to some belief quite a number of these workers were still allowed to continue under the new government.

Masquerader question! Can the former Minister tell the nation how was he able to amass so much in such a little time, during a period when he himself described it as the greatest recession since his great grandmother lived? Maybe if it was not so well disguised then more persons would have bought into the idea of him being the best Finance Minister in the region.

Dr. Mitchell campaigned on the promise of inclusion and so far he has stuck to his word much to the dismay of some. You see, Dr Mitchell was the one who assuredly said that if he had to do it all over it was going to be done differently.

This new era must be done within the context of wisdom and caution since a few NDC supporters are openly hostile towards the newly democratically elected government.

Under these prevailing circumstances one cannot help but accept those who are willing to work and shares the vision of the new government. Good human resource management will dictate that.

With unemployment what it is the human resource options available to government are varied and competitive. The inclusions of former Minister Karl Hood and Derrick James to diplomatic postings are good examples of this new thrust of participatory democracy.

The office of the Governor General is another one of those brilliant choices made by our new Prime Minister. Being Grenada’s first female to hold the office she has certainly brought with her a taste Grenadians both locally and abroad relishes.

Democracy in Grenada is alive and well. The arms of our state remain robust and unrestricted in light of our present prevailing circumstances. The dark days of old are behind us and Grenadians are looking forward to the hope that the change of government on February 19 has brought with it.

Julius Gabriel

Tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.