7 hours from middle age may be optimal for sleep

New research has found that about seven hours of sleep is the best night’s sleep, and is associated with adequate and excessive sleep, the ability to concentrate, learn new things to remember, solve problems, and make decisions.

Seven hours of sleep has been found to be associated with better mental health, with people experiencing more or less sleep, more anxiety and depression and more symptoms of overall well-being.

“Although we can not be sure that too little or too much sleep causes cognitive problems, our analysis of long-term individuals’ vision seems to support this idea,” said Jianfeng Feng, a professor and professor at Futan University in China. Study According to a report in the scientific journal Nature Aging.

“But the causes of poor sleep in the elderly seem to be complicated by the combination of our genetic makeup and the structure of our brain.”

Researchers from China and the United Kingdom analyzed data from 500,000 adults aged 38 to 73 who were part of the UK Biobank – a long-term, government-backed health study. Participants were asked about their sleep patterns, mental health and well-being and participated in a series of cognitive experiments. Nearly 40,000 of the study participants received brain imaging and genetic data.

Other research Older adults who have significant difficulty sleeping and often experience night waking are at risk of developing dementia or dying prematurely for any reason, while sleeping less than six hours a night Associated with cardiovascular disease.

One reason for the connection between too little sleep and cognitive decline may be due to the disruption of deep sleep, which is when the brain adjusts the body from day to day depletion and integrates memories. Very little sleep is associated with the formation of amyloid, an important protein that can characterize certain types of dementia in the brain. The study also found that it is possible to fall asleep longer from poor quality, fragmented sleep.

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He is a spokesman for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Geck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. Raj Dasgupta said that prolonged sleep is associated with cognitive problems but it is not entirely clear. Why.

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“It sets a precedent for future research and the search for treatment,” said Dasgupta, who is not involved in the research. “Sleep is essential as we get older, and we need it just as much as young people, but it’s hard to come by.”

There were some limitations in the study – it only assesses the total amount of time participants slept and did not assess the quality of sleep as being awake at night. What’s more, participants reported the amount of their sleep, so it was not objectively measured. However, the authors said that due to the large number of people involved in the study, its results may be strong.

The authors said their findings suggest that about seven hours of sleep is important.

The study shows a link between more and less sleep and cognitive problems, not cause and effect, Russell Foster, a professor at Oxford University and director of the Sir Jules Thorne Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, warned not to engage in research. He said the study did not take into account the health of individuals and that short or prolonged sleep may be a sign of basic health conditions with cognitive problems.

Taking the average seven hours of sleep as the optimal amount of sleep “ignores the fact that there is considerable personal variation in the duration and quality of sleep,” he said. Less or more sleep may be completely healthy for some people, he said.

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“We are constantly told that the ‘best’ night’s sleep for the elderly should be seven hours of uninterrupted sleep. This belief is wrong in many ways. Said Foster, author of the upcoming book “Life Time: The New Science of the Body Clock, and How It Can Revolution Your Sleep and Health.”

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“How long we sleep, our preferred sleep times and how often we wake up at night will vary according to individuals and ages. Sleep is energetic, and we all have different sleep patterns, and the important thing is to evaluate our individuality. Needs.”

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